Tag-Archive for ◊ hydroponics ◊

Author:
• Wednesday, November 28th, 2012

I have seen these vertical towers in action and they are a great invention because they save space and allow city dwellers to grow a good amount of food from any south facing window in homes and apartments.

Source: KickStarter

We want to change the way produce is grown & distributed, FOREVER

To accomplish this goal, we have to make the production of greens and vegetables easy to do and accessible to everyone.   So, we designed a special production system based on our patented vertical towers that allows us to grow more produce using less space, and then transport the unharvested towers to market.  It allows us to sell “You-Pick” vegetables at the supermarket, letting the customers pick exactly how much they want. 

Author:
• Friday, May 13th, 2011

Square foot gardenI’ve been rather busy lately, building my own square foot garden (photo right). Hopefully, you’ve also started a garden, no matter how small. Here’s a book that shows you how to start a square inch garden on a balcony or windowsill.

Source: Chelsea Books

Books on container gardening have been wildly popular with urban and suburban readers, but until now, there has been no comprehensive “how-to” guide for growing fresh food in the absence of open land. Fresh Food from Small Spaces fills the gap as a practical, comprehensive, and downright fun guide to growing food in small spaces. It provides readers with the knowledge and skills necessary to produce their own fresh vegetables, mushrooms, sprouts, and fermented foods as well as to raise bees and chickens—all without reliance on energy-intensive systems like indoor lighting and hydroponics.

Readers will learn how to transform their balconies and windowsills into productive vegetable gardens, their countertops and storage lockers into commercial-quality sprout and mushroom farms, and their outside nooks and crannies into whatever they can imagine, including sustainable nurseries for honeybees and chickens. Free space for the city gardener might be no more than a cramped patio, balcony, rooftop, windowsill, hanging rafter, dark cabinet, garage, or storage area, but no space is too small or too dark to raise food.

With this book as a guide, people living in apartments, condominiums, townhouses, and single-family homes will be able to grow up to 20 percent of their own fresh food using a combination of traditional gardening methods and space-saving techniques such as reflected lighting and container “terracing.” Those with access to yards can produce even more.